Categories
Wyoming

Remote Possibilities: Dubois Wyoming

“I wish we had known we wanted to move here 5 years ago,” my new neighbor Karen said rather wistfully a few days ago. “But we didn’t know!

She was speaking about one of the most remote places in the middle of nowhere: the town of Dubois in the upper Wind River Valley of Wyoming. Like so many who have chosen to retire here, Karen and her husband came once on vacation, returned and returned again, and gradually fell in love. Others have fallen in love right away.

When my husband suggested actually moving to Dubois rather than just visiting, the idea seemed crazy and impossible. Leave New York City for the wilds of Wyoming? But it’s only wild in a wonderful and different way, and 8 years on I’m deeply grateful that we moved here.

How is Dubois remote? It’s more than an hour’s drive to the nearest big towns (Jackson, Lander, and Riverton), and 3 hours to the nearest Interstate. Most of the surrounding terrain is public land, much of it officially wilderness, owned by the US Forest Service, the US Bureau of Land Management, or the state of Wyoming. By one standard, a survey from the US Geological Survey, is only about 40 miles away as the crow flies from the most remote spot in the lower 48 states, in the southeast corner of Yellowstone Park.

Nonetheless, we do have many of the advantages that residents from Washington DC, Chicago, even Paris and Stockholm may consider essential to the good life. Dubois has a choice of good restaurants with different cuisines, two places to buy a latte or cappuccino, and two taverns. It also has world-class Internet service, thanks to the fact that the head of the local telephone company was a prime mover in the national effort to bring broadband service to rural areas of America. (Telecommuting is a distinct possibility: I worked from Dubois for a large international corporation for 8 years before I retired, and others here also have Internet-based careers.)

Surrounded by some of the most spectacular vistas in the American West, Dubois (it’s pronounced “dew-boys”) is home to a diverse mixture of active and very interesting people who are deeply committed to maintaining what we love about this village of 1,000 residents that swells to 2,000 in the summer:

The variety and beauty of the landscape: Situated near the Continental Divide, we live about an hour’s drive from the south entrance to Yellowstone Park, on the ecological dividing line between high Alpine forest and red rock badlands. We are surrounded by two major ranges of the Rocky Mountains, the Absarokas and the Wind River Mountains. This may be the only place on earth where you can see all three mountain-building processes (tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary erosion) from one location.

The nature of the community: A combination of the traditional independence of the American West and the vitality of its newcomers, Dubois’ community is deeply self-reliant and also welcoming. Generally, people here don’t care what you used to do or the size of your bank balance; they care how you relate to your neighbors. We mind our own business but respond quickly if someone is in trouble. What’s more, the proceeds from almost any event in town (and we’re ferociously busy in the summer!) go to local charities.

The history: The first visitors to the area were the trappers who opened the West. Next came the hardy homesteaders and then the tie hacks who cut logs that supplied the railroad ties that opened the rest of the West. Butch Cassidy lived and owned property here. One of the best preserved gold-mining ghost towns in the US, South Pass City, is an easy day trip away near Lander. A recent and surprising discovery atop a nearby mountain, the remains of a Shoshone village, inspired a curator at the Natural History Museum in New York to call Dubois “the epicenter of Rocky Mountain archaeology.”

The activities: We may live in the middle of nowhere, but we have plenty to do. Artists, photographers, and musicians gravitate here, so weekends are busy with jam sessions or performances by musicians, art or photography shows, speakers about history or archaeology at the local museum, an eye-popping quilt show, or pack-horse or chariot races. You might join the tourists at the weekly square dance or rodeo. It’s often difficult to set aside time for what you might really want to do instead: fish, hike, golf, or get away in your camper.

The climate: The Shoshone natives settled here centuries ago partly because of the mild climate. We call it the “valley of the warm winds,” sheltered from wintry blasts by the Tetons over near Jackson and our hovering wedge of local mountains. Summers in Dubois are cooler and more pleasant than elsewhere in Wyoming (or almost anywhere). We often find the winters more temperate and tolerable than back in New York City. It may snow sideways for four days, but then it all blows away.

The economics: Real estate prices are modest. We traded a small 3-bedroom second home in Connecticut for a very large 4-bedroom log lodge with a cathedral ceiling. We don’t find prices of necessities any higher than anywhere else. There’s no Macy’s or Nordstrom’s, but we do have a Family Dollar.

The downsides: Dubois has only a part-time doctor, a full-time nurse practitioner, and a dentist. It takes over an hour to drive to a specialist or a hospital (but that could take just as long in New York City). Shopping is limited (but now, of course, there’s the Internet and FedEx). US mail generally takes a day longer than in a large city. The produce in the supermarket in winter is often disappointing, and you may have to wait for your next trip to Jackson if your recipe calls for chipotle-flavored mayonnaise or dried seaweed.

About this time of year, my husband and I begin to discuss exactly when we should head back east to spend the holidays with the rest of the family. I anticipate my return to New York City with pleasure, because it’s a chance to relax in a place where nothing ever happens (that I can’t miss) and where I hardly know anybody (after four decades). Before long, I’m dying to get back home to Dubois.
(Read more about daily life in Dubois at www.livingdubois.wordpress.com.)

Dubois WY

Originally posted 2020-09-01 05:01:07.

Categories
Small Town Living

Small Town America Parades

Small Town Parades

Nothing shows the great community spirit of small town America more than a parade. Small towns love a parade. People come to town to see floats, bands and drill teams, military flag team, antique cars, trucks and tractors, and clowns, Shriners, politicians in old cars, grand marshals, beauty queens,  flatbeds, boats, maybe a fire truck with Santa Claus aboard at the end of the parade.  The crowd at parades are festive and everyone is having fun. Small towns have parades for Fourth of July, Old Soldiers Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Founders Day and other occasions.

These photos were taken in Richmond Hill Ga by Mathew Rodocker and Robert Fowler in Johns Creek GA.

small town America parade
Small town America Holiday parade
shriner parade
Shriners on motorcycles are in many small town parades
boy scouts at small town parade
(r) Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts in parade
Santa on firetruck
Santa on Fire Truck comes at the end of the parade
clown in parade
(r) Clown in parade

All images and web site content copyright by owners and photographers. All rights reserved.

Listen to Johns Creek GA band in this small town parade.

Originally posted 2013-12-17 22:00:27.

Categories
Small Town Living Small Towns

How is Living in a Small Town Different

Smalls towns are not what they used to be. These days they appeal to most everyone who wants a brake from the rat race of urbanized living. Small towns offer so much more than they used to.

That being the case, what are some of the differences you will notice if you move from a metro area to a small town.  I am about to find out moving from a metro area that is getting more urbanized everyday to a small town out one the fringes of a metro area. This move will be to a Del Webb community and that seems to be their ideal location, far enough but not too far, from metro areas.

My post: Anticipating a Move to a Small Town

We have purchased the home and are downsizing our current household belongings, meeting with an interior designer who is giving us input on what to bring and will help set up our home in the new community.

So we are in the process of moving, but are following our new community with many visits to the community and surrounding area during our moving process. Observations are being made and I am updating this page with new observations.

The purpose of this posts will be to share my observations about how living in a small town is different and I have two observations to start this list and will add more as we move.

1. More Influence in the Community.

Kind of like you become a bigger fish in a smaller pond type thing. Your input and efforts make a bigger difference. Example: The county wanted to dig up one of the new tennis courts in my new community to lay a utility line and said they would return the courts to same or better condition.  They did not. They tried to repair the courts but they kept cracking. The county was not going to do anything further but talk.  In the recent county elections the community got behind a new candidate who took their tennis court issue seriously and with help of the community got elected. The new commissioner got this problem taken care of.  That is one example and I am sure there are more not just in politics but in volunteering and other causes.

2. Traffic is different.

Traffic is lighter and is less congested but some things are further away.  So you might drive further with a less congested drive and arrive about the same time. In fairness, many things are closer but some are not. I will hone this initial observation once I start living there everyday.

I very much look forward to continuing this list very soon with my observations of how living in a small town is different than living in a metro area.

3. Churches are Small Too.

Rather than the huge mega churches found in the city and suburbs, smaller churches are all around. In this area many of them are quaint architecturally.

4. Fresh Produce is available.

In the city, the organic farmers markets on Saturday were high priced and very little selections sold by middle men making their markups taking produce from boxes from who knows where. In a small town, there are produce stands selling fruits and vegetables that taste like they should at a reasonable cost.

Robert and Mary Ann Fowler

Originally posted 2020-08-20 11:22:00.

Categories
Small Town Living

Retirement Living in Small Towns : Is It for You?

Some people looking forward to retirement have their sights set on adventure and travel. Others may want the hustle and bustle of a big city, to enjoy cultural pursuits they never had time for during their working years. Many, though, would like nothing better than to relax in a quiet, homey environment with friendly neighbors and low stress. If this is you, small town retirement may offer the peace and quiet you seek, as well as a surprising number of other benefits you may not have considered:

Lower housing costs. Rural land is generally less expensive than that close in to urban areas, homes usually cost less to build, and property taxes are often significantly lower than those in the city.  Some retirement communities in small towns.

Lower cost of living. Although transportation of goods may mean that some groceries and household items cost a bit more outside of urban areas, most other expenses of daily life are lower. In general, utilities, insurance, home maintenance, car repair, and many other goods and services are less expensive in smaller towns.

Lower crime rates. With less concentrated populations, small towns avoid much of the crime you might experience in big cities.

More park like, natural setting. If you are invigorated by exposure to the outdoors, trees, and wildlife, you can get these benefits by stepping right outside your door into your back yard. You could even plant your own garden to reap more benefits of the time you spend outdoors. Small towns are less densely populated and because of the virus, some are moving away from the cities to small towns.

Peace and quiet. Unlike living in the city, you don’t hear “noise pollution” such as sirens, yelling, traffic, horns, and the general rumble of thousands of people living in close quarters. The lights you see at night come from the moon and stars instead of the “overglow” from neon signs, traffic lights, street lamps, and headlights. The reduced sound and light distractions can lead to less stress, and an improved ability to relax and sleep.

More Personable – People  in the small towns seem to be more friendly.  They say Hi to you on the street. Some people are more accessible  to you, for example you can even phone up your mayor or state representative and talk.

Many small towns have 55+ communities within their borders or just outside of town. Even if you choose to live in your own home outside of a retirement community, small towns may provide similar benefits: a close-knit community, helpful and friendly neighbors with similar lifestyles, and a town center where you can engage in social activities. For a retiree seeking rest and relaxation, a small town retirement is a lifestyle worth considering.

Advantages of Small Towns
More Reasons to Live in a Small Town

Originally posted 2020-09-06 08:09:22.

Categories
Small Town Living

Advantages Of Living in a Small Town

As a child I lived in a small town and people were always helping out each other.  I miss that feeling sometimes.

So I am making a list of a few things other positive advantages of living in a small town, just to remind myself and share with you.

  1. Most people know each other and when someone needs help it is easier to find.
  2. Families seem to be closer.
  3. The pace is much slower
  4. Church is a major activity
  5. Small group gathering such as hometown picnics and celebrations bring people of all ages closer together
  6. People are there during times of need such as death even if they are not immediate family
  7. Relatives from the city like to visit their relatives in a small town as a peaceful get away
  8. Crime is usually less
  9. Gardening, fishing and other activities such as this are enjoyed
  10. One can walk to the store, parks, church and such just for pleasure or exercise
  11. People share what they grow in their gardens and enjoy sharing their canning recipes
  12. When you go to the town store you actually see neighbors that you know and are on a first name basis with the butcher
  13. Usually if there is a town Dr. and one is sick the Dr. will always see that person
  14. Banks and insurance people know you on a first name basis
  15. There is gossip but some times that is not all bad because people pay closer attention to doing the right thing
  16. The elderly usually have a feeling of closeness in a small town
  17. Housing is usually less expensive
  18. It is a big town deal when there is a birth of a child even if that child is not family
  19. People usually speak and say howdy even if they don’t know you
  20. In the summer you can feel more at ease with leaving your windows and doors open to allow for fresh air
  21. The air just smells better
  22. The birds seem to sing louder
  23. You can actually look at the stars, sunrise and sunset from your own front or backyard
  24. The simple things in life are more satisfying
  25. All in all most small town people are close and friendly
  26. More places to get out and talk a walk
  27. You can see stars in the night sky
  28. With Covid virus around, it may even be safer.

So this is just a few of the positives of small town living that I remember from my childhood when I lived in a small town.  Do have live in a small town or have memories of living in a small town?  If so, scroll to the bottom of the page and comment to let me know.

Ann shared this post as WorkingBoomer on SmallTownRetirement

Originally posted 2020-08-12 08:33:23.

Categories
Florida

The Villages in Florida is a Small Town Retirement Mecca

P1000626The Villages in Florida is a great place to retire to. Many retirees have chosen The Villages to spend their lives living a fun and interesting life surrounded by their peers. Most people look forward to retirement and this small town provides the perfect place for them to retire to. It was created specifically for senior citizens to have a place where they can come together and enjoy each other’s company. In fact, there are so many people living here that are over the age of 55 that this community is one of the world’s biggest retirement communities.

Seniors who want to visit this community before deciding whether or not to make it their home can come for a vacation and stay in a fully equipped cabana. The Creekside Cabanas can be found in Lake Sumter Landing. Those who come and stay in one of the community’s cabanas will receive a golf car that they can use for the duration of their stay. Some of the recreational activities offered include tennis and golf courts, pools and fitness & recreation centers. The signature stores found in this community offer discounts and free movie tickets to visitors. These are all privileges that the community’s residents are entitled to every day.

Visitors can board a boat for a very relaxing ride that departs from Lake Sumter Landing. They can also take a tour of the town by hopping aboard the community’s trolley. There are countless exciting activities offered to residents on a regular basis such as the community’s three town squares; Brownwood Paddock, Spanish Springs Town and the Lake Sumter Landing Market Square.

Brownwood Paddock Square is designed to look like a typical cattle town in Florida. Residents and visitors can see a movie at the Barnstorm Theatre, which shows the newest Hollywood releases. It is also the home of Brownwood Paddock Square’s log cabin, where live performances take place every single night. The Spanish Springs Town Square has a southwest feel to it, which can be seen in the town square’s shops and fountains. Some of attractions found in Spanish Springs include the Church on the Square, the Rialto Theatre and Cruise-In, which is a monthly classic car show. There are many restaurants to choose from that offer both indoor and outdoor seating. Live entertainment takes place every night at the Spanish Springs Town Square as well. Lake Sumter Landing resembles an intimate seaside village. The landing’s lighthouse is a Spanish Springs landmark. Lake Sumter Landing is also where the Old Mill Playhouse movie theatre is located.

In addition to all the fun aspects of these small towns, potential residents should know that their physical, mental and spiritual health would be taken care of while living here. There are many health care and fitness facilities on site, as well as The Villages Regional Hospital, a VA outpatient clinic and the Moffitt Cancer Center. The community has a hospital dedicated to long term acute care.

The Spanish Springs Town Square holds the MVP Sports Club, which offers personal training, spas services and exercise/fitness classes. The various fitness centers found throughout the community provide residents with a place to work out with weight training machines or treadmills.

Those residents who wish to attend church while living in the community have many choices at their disposal. Some of the churches that can be found here are the Hope Lutheran Church, Temple Shalom the Chapel of Christian Faith, St. Timothy’s Catholic Church, Open Bible Lutheran Church, and the St. George Episcopal Church.

Residents who wish to keep their minds sharp can always take classes at the community’s Lifelong Learning College. Classes are offered all year long in a variety of different subjects.

Transportation throughout the community is made easy because every resident has their own golf car, which they can easily drive to any of the attractions found in this diverse community.

Originally posted 2013-03-13 13:25:17.