Categories
Tennessee

Tennessee Best Towns

The enchanting state of Tennessee is filled with lush greenery, amazing bodies of water and woodlands, and a culture unlike any other state. With Nashville as the glue of the state, the country culture flows out from the city and into the small towns of the Volunteer State.

For those frustrated with city traffic and smoldering fog, small towns in Tennessee offer a haven of peace, culture and plenty of recreational activities. Tennessee with beautiful scenery and good four seasons weather.  I know I live visiting the Great Smokey Mountains Park.

TN will also be very attractive to retirees from other states. Starting in 2021 Tennessee will have no state income tax and also other retirement income breaks. The location has good proximity to much of our country.

Clarksville TN is on Money Magazine’s Best Places to live.

Around Nashville and there are several small towns that would be nice to retire in and the town of Brentwood is one of the nicest ones. Brentwood has 13 parks and plenty of walking trails to keep you fit.  Nolensville is another small town with a close knit community in the Nashville area. Mount Juliet is a Nashville suburb located 28 East with a population of about 30,000.  Hendersonviille TN located on Old Hickory Lake, next to the Cumberland River and is a good place for water sports and that retirement favorite fishing.

Murfreesboro is a big small town (120,000 pop.) with parks and 12 miles of greenway.

Oak Ridge on the East side of Tennessee, which is Anderson County, about 25 miles outside of Knoxville, has one of the lowest crime rates and costs of housing in the state.  It is not hard to see why this is a good retirement small town.

Germantown is a place you should check out if you are planning on living in the Memphis area, it has affordable housing.  Another small town to check out in the Memphis area is Collierville, which is a prosperous area with a population of about 50,000.

More Tennessee Retirement Towns

1. Cosby TN

With a population of around 5,000 residents, the small town of Cosby is slow-paced and inviting. Cosby is located in the northwestern corner of the state near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Traditionally a small Appalachian town, Cosby is recognized today for its serene setting and astonishing views. Family run businesses are scattered along the main road and fruit stands abound offering nearly every variety of apple. The town is peaceful and free from traffic, yet offers everything a person needs with regard to modern amenities.

2. Dyersburg TN

Dyersburg is located in the southern section of the state and offers a population of just under 25,000 residents. Dyersburg is an ideal location to live because of its affordability, not to mention high quality schooling and beautiful display of Victorian homes and architecture. The town is free from congestion and large amounts of traffic yet close enough to state highways and interstates offering convenient access to the city.

3. Franklin Tennessee

The town of Franklin, Tennessee contains approximately 58,000 residents and has a strong historical presence. In fact, some Civil War sites can be seen in the town. The area is just twenty minutes from Nashville and has a large musical influence featured throughout the town. Some of the country music’s up-and-coming stars live in the town and can be seen at the downtown coffee shops before heading out to perform a live concert. During the summer months, a Bluegrass Festival and Franklin Jazz Festival take place.

Originally posted 2020-09-03 07:00:41.

Categories
Small Towns

Great Small Town Main Streets

Great Small Town Main Streets

My travels last week took me to two small towns with great main streets.  I have seen rejuvenated downtown areas of small towns before, in fact they are quite common. But these two small towns had wonderful main streets, which defined each city.

Hendersonville NC Main Street

Main Street Hendersonville NC
Main Street Hendersonville NC
Main Street Hendersonville NC
Main Street Hendersonville NC

Greenville SC Main Street

Main Street Greenville SC
Main Street Greenville SC
Downtown Greenville SC
We love the renovated Downtown Greenville SC

Both of the outstanding Main Streets had plenty in common.  They are historical, have unique architecture, are very walkable. They are the center of downtowns, good places to stroll, esthetically appealing, have plenty of activities weekly and fairs and festivals often. Greenville SC has some great restaurants! Just make you feel good to visit.  These Main Streets are a major reason why both Greenville and Hendersonville have so many visitors.

Main Streets have a history and a personality. They are each different. They are more like walking in a park rather than a shopping mall.  Much more interesting.

Big wide sidewalks, brick accents, statues, interesting lamps and of course benches, flowers and plenty of things to see and do.

Small Town Resources:
Historic Hendersonville NC
Our visit to Greenville SC
Greenville Visitors Center
South Carolina Small Towns

Photos below from – Where is the Best Main Street?

Main Street Rockland
Rockland, Maine
Main Street McMinnville
McMinnville OR Main Street
Holland MI
Holland MI Main Street

Originally posted 2020-09-02 19:32:53.

Categories
Retirement Homes

Searching for Retirement Home Can be Fun

Destin FL - Where to retire
Getting out and exploring new things is always fun.  Exploring retirement home options can fall in to that category.  Maybe you have a little more time to take a few days off. Explore retirement options in your area, your city, your region and far away. Make it your hobby to research and then to travel and experience new options you now have.

Experience the Vacation Getaways at the Active Adult 55+ Communities with a trip of 3 or 4 days and see first hand what they are all about. In addition you get to visit the town and area where the community is located.  These are positive experiences at very little costs.

Next visit small towns in your area and region. This would be as short as a day trip, an overnight trip or spent 2 or 3 days and visit several small towns.   Do your research first on the web and plan your visit. Visit during a festival or town event would be interesting as well. There are many advantages to retiring in a small town but just visiting can be fun too.

Next travel to a resort area and combine a vacation and a retirement research trip. Go to Hilton Head for a week. While there explore some of the communities in the area.  Warning: don’t buy any timeshares while there. Enjoy your vacation and learn something too. You have a legitimate reason for visiting the communities, you are not wasting anyone’s time. You are the prime prospect, but most communities are helpful and low pressure.  If you really did fall in love with the place, maybe renting for a season would be a good idea first.

Finally explore your own city. Research first then go downtown and experience the mixed use, high rise, loft, town centers and other interesting concepts in your very own metro downtown or midtown.  What would it be like to walk to restaurants and museums from your very own condo. Urban life is not for everyone but there are some boomers moving downtown to experience the advanatages of retirement city living style.

But the main to remember is to have fun! There are no deadlines and you don’t have to do anything. Take your time during your visit to take it all in.

Originally posted 2012-06-11 10:45:15.

Categories
South Carolina

Retiring to South Carolina’s Lowcountry

Bay Street in Beaufort SC

 

We made a visit to Beaufort in the South Carolina Lowcountry. This area around Beaufort seems perfect for retirement living.

Here is a report on a few of the small towns, islands and communities in the Lowcountry that you may want to check out for places to retire.

 

Beaufort SC

Beaufort is a wonderful small town to visit on vacation, that is for sure. We enjoyed the carriage tour of the historical district and seeing the wonderful old homes here. We enjoyed walking the streets in the tourist areas off Bay Street and eating at the wonderful restaurants, especially those with seafood. We enjoyed the day trips up the Sea Island Parkway to visit Lady’s Island where some of the people we talked with in Beaufort told us they lived and mentioned when we asked about a good place to retire in the Lowcountry of SC. We enjoyed walking along the Waterfront Park on the Beaufort River on the backside of Bay Street and sitting on the decks of the restaurants there.

Lowcountry Retirement Towns / Islands

There are not any Over 55 Communities that we could find in the area except of course the Sun City Hilton Head which is about 30 miles away. People do retire to the Lowcountry but live in homes near Beaufort or on one of the many Sea Islands. Crossing the bridge from the historical district on the Sea Island Parkway you enter Mary’s Island which is home to several retirement community like communities, but not age qualified.

That’s OK for sure and actually preferred by many, living among multi-generations. Several of the communities had wonderful clubhouses with plenty of amenities. Of course these are resort style communities and are usually not far from a body of water,  if not actually waterfront or marsh front themselves.

Living in any of these communities would give you a great base for visiting nature, the beach, any of the numerous sea islands, Beaufort, Hilton Head, Savannah and Charleston.

Some Lowcountry Communities That Might Be Nice to Retire To

Our research led us to these Lowcountry communities as being great places to live, retired or not.

Coosaw Point http://www.coosawpoint.com/ – Located on Lady’s Island, this is a 400 acre beautiful Lowcountry community on the edge of the ACE Basin with all it’s wildlife , old rice fields, streams, wetlands and marches. Yet this community is only 10 minutes to Beaufort. A 12,000 square foot clubhouse with amenities and a causal feel for Lowcountry living at it’s best.

Newpoint SC – Another waterfront community on Lady’s Island boast a walking neighborhood that overlooks the beautiful Beaufort River. About 50+ acres it is a good size but not huge community.

Distant Island – We rode through The Village at Distant Island on Mary’s Island and saw some beautiful custom built homes in this waterfront community.

Pleasant Point Plantation on Ladys Island also has a waterfront location and a wide price range on homes.

Habersham SC is a beautiful small town on the coast of Broad River and is perfect for your retirement living. http://www.habershamsc.com/index.html

Dataw Island http://www.discoverdataw.com/ – East of Beaufort, this really is a retirement island as there are mostly adults living here in a gated community. It boasts golf course homes, waterfront and marsh front homes in this beautiful community that would be great for retirement.

Fripp Island http://www.frippislandrealestate.com/ is another island about 21 miles from Beaufort to check out. The whole island is a gated community! It’s a vacation resort but several hundred people live at Fripp also.

I think staying for a few days in Beaufort would give you a good base to scout out all of the above communities and have a great vacation as well. Maybe you will find a Lowcountry community that will be perfect for you to retire to.

For more information on Beaufort and surrounding towns and communities contact Keith Strawn at explorebeaufortrealestate.com

Resources:
More small towns in South Carolina
Thanks to Todd Covington at Low Country Properties

Originally posted 2013-11-01 16:44:42.

Categories
Atlanta Ellijay Georgia North Georgia Mountains

Big Canoe – Retirement in North Georgia Mountains

Big Canoe is perfect for
Retirement in North Georgia Mountains

Big Canoe is one of the nicest large mountain resort communities in the country. It’s a small town in itself.

Last week we used a friends home in Big Canoe for a couple of days for a family reunion and I was reminded what a nice community Big Canoe is.  It is a beautiful mountain community with 8,000 acres, 3 or 4 lakes and 22 miles of trails.  A self sustaining park like resort community only one hour north of Atlanta GA.

Lake at Big Canoe
Lake at Big Canoe

Now Big Canoe is not officially a retirement community but they have everything say a Del Webb Community has and more. There are over 100 clubs in their activity center building as well a gym, pool, craft room, etc.  Several restaurants are in the community. Some more reasons we like Big Canoe for a retirement home.

Originally posted 2020-09-01 11:16:47.

Categories
Canada

Retirement Areas in BC Canada

BC CanadaWhen I started thinking about where I was going to retire, the obvious came to mind first: The Sunbelt. Florida. Arizona. Texas. Southern California. In addition, every time I started seriously considering any of these alternatives, I started to sweat. I am really not an all-warm-weather kind of person. I enjoy seasonal changes, low humidity, and mild summers. I actually like snow – especially if I no longer have to go out in it to go to work. Therefore, I started looking into less-cliché retirement destinations, and happened upon an article about retiring to British Columbia, Canada. I was hooked.

British Columbia, the westernmost province in Canada, sits along the Pacific Coast. The coastline stretches over 17,000 miles, and boasts deep fjords, bays, and inlets, as well as thousands of tiny coastal islands. Alaska and the Yukon Territories are to the north of B.C., the province of Alberta is to the east, and the U.S. states of Washington, Idaho, and Montana border B.C. to the south. With its metropolitan areas of Victoria and Vancouver, British Columbia offers some choice urban retirement communities for those who enjoy the multiculturalism, nightlife, and easy access to amenities found in cities; but the real draw for me was the wonderful selection of active adult communities in B.C.’s many small towns and suburbs.

British Columbia offers a long list of benefits for seniors residing there. Canada’s solid economic position, the high demand in B.C. for older, experienced workers, and, of course, the Canadian health care system all create a very hospitable environment for retirees, be they Canadians or American expats. Add the strong banking system and low, predictable inflation rates, and you can see that there are many reasons why the financially savvy 55+ crowd may seriously consider a Northern migration. Consider, for example: The average retiree in the U.S. will incur approximately $250,000 worth of medical expenses during retirement. Canadians, on the other hand, who are fully insured through government-provided basic health care, need only worry about 30 percent of those costs – or roughly $75,000. On top of that, the B.C. labor market provides a wide range of opportunities for older workers who still want to work part-time after retirement..

But finances aside, the climate, landscape, and social aspects of retiring to British Columbia are what drew me. Summers are glorious, with temperatures usually in the high 60s and 70s and a distinct lack of humidity – perfect for outdoor activities like golf, fishing, hiking, bicycling, boating, and camping (but bring your DEET!). The fishing rivals that of Minnesota, with thousands of lakes, streams, and ponds as well as unparalleled salt-water fishing along the coast. And the scenic beauty and recreational opportunities make British Columbia seem like one giant national park, with old-growth forest, gorgeous ocean views, gemlike glacial lakes, and the commanding presence of its snow-topped Canadian Cascades mountain range.

When I trekked up Interstate 5 to British Columbia to see for myself what retirement would be like there, I found some of the most pleasant, neighborly people and inclusive communities I have come across in my decades of travel. B.C.’s small towns offer the perfect combination of multiculturalism, open-mindedness, and isolation; you get a sense of belonging, acceptance, and mutual interdependence not found in many U.S. towns. The people are warm and welcoming. Neighbors help each other and engage each other at a personal level. I immediately felt at home, before I even decided where I wanted to live.

MoneySense magazine recently published their ranking of Canada’s 10 best retirement areas, with five of the top ten in British Columbia. This is likely because of the province’s relatively mild marine climate. The city of Victoria was at the top of the list, for its very cosmopolitan and international flavor and the fact that it sits within the Olympic “rain shadow” (getting less than a quarter the precipitation of Renfrew, just 80 miles away). The metropolitan area of Vancouver, B.C. and its many suburbs was next on the list. The smaller B.C. communities of Courtenay (on Vancouver Island), Salmon Arm (central B.C.), and Vernon (in the Okanagan region) also made the cut.

If you are looking for a retirement area with spectacular geography, beautiful seasonal changes, a mild climate, economic strength, an atmosphere of social unity, and vibrant multiculturalism, British Columbia, Canada may be the place for you.

Originally posted 2013-06-13 14:28:31.